The Maslow Project September 2017

The 501-c-3 Files from The Ashland Sneak Preview

By Sophia and Adam Bogle

     Recently, the Maslow Project celebrated their 8th anniversary with a newly remodeled and upgraded center of operations and I went to the ribbon cutting ceremony to get a tour of the facility. I found the upgrades to be both welcoming and professional, but the thing that struck me most about this visit was the amazing enthusiasm and energy of the staff. I got to meet Jorge Zamarripa, the Project Manager, who orchestrated the remodeling.He had obviously thought hard about the needs of their clients. From the phone charging station, to having a guitar hanging on the wall, it just feels good to be there.

     The Maslow Project has a rather daunting task: to provide support to the shocking number of local un-housed youth and their families in the Rogue Valley, and yet they manage it with notable good humor and aplomb. While taking the tour, I met their job coach, Gary Montgomery. Gary took a moment to tell me how happy it made him to help people realize their own skills and abilities. He helps people create their own resumes and they can even sign up to do practice interviews. His joy in his work was obvious and a bit contagious. He made sure to let me know that not everyone who comes in jumps right to getting a resume made. There are a lot of basic needs that have to be met before that is a priority.

     I also ran into Lacey Renae, a Maslow Counselor, who was showing our tour group the upgraded art room. Art is seen as an important part of the Maslow layers of success. Not that everyone has to do art there, but the creative outlet is recognized as a basic human need. The art room is well stocked with the basics but I know they can always use more good quality supplies. I was also impressed to hear how Lacey is given the flexibility to be able to meet clients in the way that works best for them. The whole system at Maslow is highly functional.

     They can supply a mailing address when one is not readily available which helps with getting a driver’s license and job applications. They can also help with such basic things as food, clothes and assistance finding shelter. The lounge area has a computer to help with job hunting and there are snacks available thanks to donations.

     One of the things that stands out at Maslow is their Youth Advisory Board. The ages of the kids on the board range from 14 to 18. They are responsible for making their own decisions about Maslow community issues, they plan and create meals together and they choose special projects to do to give back, such as working with the animals at Sanctuary One.

     As you can see, I am a fan. Supporting the Maslow Project makes a huge difference to some of our most vulnerable citizens. Now, I just know that after such a glowing description of helpful efficacy that you must be wondering how you can help, so you will be pleased to know that September 23rd is the 4th Annual Southern Oregon Smoked Salmon Festival! What better way to contribute than to also go have a fantastic day in the park with your family? Held in Medford at The Commons on E 5th Street, the event is kid friendly and features local food, wine and beer with live music! 100% of the event proceeds will benefit Maslow Project. For more information go to the Maslow Project Facebook Page and please “share” to help spread the word! You can also visit their website at www.maslowproject.com

     And now a word to those who may be out there couch-surfing and uncertain of the future. The center is located at 500 Monroe Street in Medford. The hours are 10-5 Monday through Friday. Call them at 541-608-6868 or email: development@maslowproject.com Their motto is “A Hand Up Not a Hand Out.” They would love to hear from you.

 

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